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ADVENTURE GREAT HIMALAYA TREKS & EXPEDITION
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Nepal Trekking Information

Types of Trek:

We can manage different mode of trekking in Nepal as per your requirement.  Mostly, there are three types of trekking modes in Nepal; Tea House Trek, Camping Trek and Guide-Porter Hiring Trek

  •  Tea-House Trek: (or Lodges and Guest House Trek):
    A Tea-house Trek is enormously standard even if it is local run guesthouse.  It is very popular in the well-developed tourist regions including Annapurna, Everest and Langtang-Helambu regions where Western meals, Continental meals, Nepalese meal (Dhalbhat), and good accommodations with attached bathroom with hot and cold shower are available in most of the places.  This type of trek offers you good meals, good accommodations in the available tea-houses & lodges.  When comparing with camping, Tea-house Trek is cheaper and more suitable for both small groups and large groups.  In tea-house trek, a tourism licensed guide, supportive Sherpa Assistant and Porters will take care of you and give well accompany on the way of mountains trails in trekking. You will be provided three times meals system (Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner) as well as accommodations in tourist guesthouses on the way of trek.
  •  Camping Trek (or Organized Trek):
    Camping Trek is also known as Fully Organized Supported Trek.  As exploratory or mountaineering expeditions, camping trek is also organized in the same style.  Camping trek comprises a team of guide, cook, Sherpa and porters to give accompany.  Our company arrange all trekking gears, food, fuel and personal belongings for you.  During trek, our guide, cooks and assistants supervise the whole operations, help to prepare hot meals and carry out all equipment.  We recommend our trekkers to carry only small bags to keep personal belongings, valuable things or the things that they might need to use during the day.  At night, our trekkers are provided dining tents, sleeping tents, toilet tents.  Also, they are provided with mattresses and down sleeping bags.  All of them are carried by our team even tables and chairs.

Trekking permit and National Park fees.

  • Everest Region:                   US$ 33  per person
  • Annapurna Region:            US$ 20 per person
  • Langtang Region:                US$ 33 per person
  • Kanchanjunga :                   US$ 433 per person

 

Restricted Trekking Areas which are opened for group trekking Only.

S.N. Area Duration Fee (per person)
1

 

Kanchangunja and Lower

 

The first 4 weeks

After the first 4 weeks

US$ 10 per week

US$ 20 per week

2

 

Upper Dolpa and

Upper Mustang

The first 10 days

After the first 10 days

US$ 500

US$ 75 per day

3

 

Manaslu

 

From Sept. to Nov.

From Dec. to Aug.

US$ 90 per week

US$ 75 per week

4

 

Humla (Simikot Yari)

 

The first 7 days

After first 7 days

US$ 90

US$ 15 per day

 

For the following restricted areas, group trekking permit will be issued from the Dept. of Immigration with prior approval by the Home Ministry.

District Trekking areas Duration Fee (per person)
Taplejung

 

Olangcugola, Lelep, Papuwa,

Yamphuding

The first 4 weeks

After the first 4 weeks

US$ 10 per week

US$ 20 per week

Sankuwashava

 

Kimathanaka, Chepuwa Hatiyagola,

Pawakhola

The first 4 weeks

After the first 4 weeks

US$ 10 per week

US$ 20 per week

Solukhumbu

North

West way to Nangpala of Namche

VDC

The first 4 weeks

After the first 4 weeks

US$ 10 per week

US$ 20 per week

Rasuwa Thuman, Timure US$ 10 per week
Manang

 

Nar, Phu, North of Tilche Village of

Thoche VDC

September to November

December to August

US$ 90 per week

US$ 75 per week

Mugu

 

Mugu, Dolphy, Pulu, Bhangree

 

The first 7 days

After the first 7 days

US$ 90

US$ 15 per day

Humla

 

Limi, Muchu, Tangekhola of Darma

VDC for passing to Tibet

The first 7 days

After the first 7 days

US$ 90

US$ 15 per day

Darchulla

 

Vyas

 

The first 7 days

After the first 7 days

US$ 90

US$ 15 per day

Bajhang Kanda, Saipal, Dhuli

TIMS Permit

Nepal, aptly, has been called ‘a Trekkers’ Paradise’.  Its high standing mountains, scenic hills and the luxuriant Terai offers some of the most spectacular trekking routes in the world.  Passing through the diverse culture and nature, trekking in Nepal is a life-time experience which involves a certain degree of physical risks owing to the rugged topography.

With the distinction of Nepal as a trekking destination and its growing charm, a provision of Trekkers’ Information Management System (TIMS) has been implemented to control illegal trekking operations and ensure safety and security of the trekkers in general trekking areas through the mechanism of Prompt Information Service as and when required.

The past experiences have shown that difficulties have been faced while carrying out rescue operations promptly during the times of accidents and natural calamities. Because of lack of proper record system of trekkers, their exact whereabouts and the information about trekking routes, rescue and search missions used to face difficulties in spotting the trekkers missing.

The provision of Trekkers’ Information Management System (TIMS) has come into force from Jan 01, 2008. Trekking Agencies Association of Nepal (TAAN) and Nepal Tourism Board (NTB) have started recording trekkers detail and issuing TIMS Card to trekkers.

Where & how to obtain TIMS Card ?
The visiting tourists, who are interested to general trekking areas of Nepal, are required to receive TIMS Card through any one of the following:

  • Kathmandu (NTB Office, TAAN Office, and Government registered trekking Companies), and
  • Pokhara (NTB Office, TAAN Office, and Government registered trekking Companies)

Why is TIMS Necessary?
The following considerations have been taken into account in the process of issuing TIMS:

  • All important details of trekkers and trekking routes shall be maintained on a computerized Database Management System that may be useful for safety and security of trekkers. To help carry out search and rescue operations for trekkers in case of natural calamities and other accidents by means of Authentic Information Service . To maintain a record system that includes personal details of trekkers, trekking area, trekking routes, handling agencies, duration, etc. The data generated from the system will be useful to all stakeholders:- tourism organizations, Government agencies, diplomatic missions, tour operators, research institute, etc.
  • Unauthorized trekking operations will be controlled, thus, resulting into better management of trekking service and in benefit of all concerned :- trekkers, agencies, field staff, Government, etc. and also occasional untoward incidents will be better prevented.
  • To upgrade the service standard and contribute for better management of sustainable mountain tourism development of Nepal.

TIMS regulatory provisions:

  • Every trekkers has to compulsorily obtain a TIMS Card before they enter any of the prescribed trekking regions and routes.
  • A Free individual trekker (FIT) or organized group trekkers are required to keep TIMS along with them throughout their treks.
  • TIMS has to be shown to TAAN / NTB authorities, national park check posts, conservation area check posts and police check posts on demand.
  • Trekkers are required to keep their copies of passports along with them for verification during trekking.
  • TIMS shall be non-transferable, non-endorsable and valid only for single entry.

TIMS will not be required for:

  • The expedition members permitted to climb the mountains.
  • The visitors in the controlled areas permitted by the Department of Immigration.
  • The foreign guests invited by the Government of Nepal.
  • The authorities from different diplomatic missions in the country, who is holding official letter/s and traveling own risk .
  • Visitors on certain mission recommended by the concerned department of the Government.

Foreign Nationals having the residential visa.

Trekking Guide Porter

Trekking Guide is Main key of your Nepal Trekking and Climbing. Why you need Trekking Guide and Porter for your Nepal Himalaya Trip.
Trekking in Nepal with Guide porter is best idea to make easy and comfortable trip. This option is for those who want a guide and porter support from us. This is an economic way of trekking in Nepal. We provide the professional guide as your requirement of language and sufficient number of porters as per your requirements at an affordable price. We would be delighted, if we could help you to meet your desired expectation to make your time memorable and enjoyable by lifting your burden. Our porter will carry your luggage and the guide will give you the best explanation about local culture, history, religion, facts of trekking, and if any emergency, he will take quick action to solve.

Altitude of Mountain Sickness

The pleasures of trekking in the world’s highest mountain ranges cannot be overstated. Neither can the dangers. Altitude sickness can occur in some people as low as 8,000 feet, but serious symptoms do not usually occur until over 12,000 feet. Even then it is not the height that is important, rather the speed in which you ascended to that altitude.

Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is actually more common in fit young men because they are more likely to attempt a rapid ascent by racing up the mountain like some indestructible super hero! As a general rule, it is far safer (and more enjoyable) to avoid altitude sickness by planning a sensible itinerary that allows for gradual acclimatization to altitude as you ascend, (you can race back down as fast as you like!).

Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS)
AMS is very common at high altitude. At over 3,000 metres (10,000 feet) 75% of people will have mild symptoms. The occurrence of AMS is dependent upon the elevation, the rate of ascent, and individual susceptibility. Many people will experience mild AMS during the acclimatization process. The symptoms usually start 12 to 24 hours after arrival at altitude and begin to decrease in severity around the third day.

The symptoms of Mild AMS include:

  • Headache
  • Nausea & Dizziness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath
  • Disturbed sleep
  • General feeling of malaise

Prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness.

  • If possible, don’t fly or drive to high altitude. Start below 3,000 metres (10,000 feet) and walk up.
  • If you do fly or drive, do not overexert yourself or move higher for the first 24 hours.
  • If you go above 3,000 metres (10,000 feet), only increase your altitude by 300 metres (1,000 feet) per day, and for every 900 metres (3,000 feet) of elevation gained, take a rest day to acclimatise.
  • Climb high and sleep low! You can climb more than 300 metres (1,000 feet) in a day as long as you come back down and sleep at a lower altitude.
  • If you begin to show symptoms of moderate altitude sickness, don’t go higher until symptoms decrease.
  • If symptoms increase, go down, down, down!
  • Keep in mind that different people will acclimatise at different rates. Make sure everyone in your party is properly acclimatised before going any higher.
  • Stay properly hydrated. Acclimatisation is often accompanied by fluid loss, so you need to drink lots of fluids to remain properly hydrated (at least four to six litres per day). Urine output should be copious and clear to pale yellow.
  • Take it easy and don’t overexert yourself when you first get up to altitude. But, light activity during the day is better than sleeping because respiration decreases during sleep, exacerbating the symptoms.
  • Avoid tobacco, alcohol and other depressant drugs including, barbiturates, tranquillisers, sleeping pills and opiates such as dihydrocodeine. These further decrease the respiratory drive during sleep resulting in a worsening of symptoms.
  • Eat a high calorie diet while at altitude.

Remember: Acclimatization is inhibited by overexertion, dehydration, and alcohol